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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old June 14th, 2018, 04:45 PM   #1
Wayne Manley
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Default Hamedan??

Good morning kind sirs and madams,

My brother recently gave me this 5í6Ēx8í2Ē rug that he hadnít used in quite some time. Unfortunately it had been in storage and has suffered some moth damage.

My brief online image search suggests perhaps Hamedan, but Iíve honestly no clue. I know my brother had it for at least 30 years. Any insights as to the style, origin, or age would be greatly appreciated. Would it be safe to use it as-is? I donít want to damage it further, but the worn-in look is somewhat appealing to me.

Dark Side


Light Side


Moth Damage (Front)


Moth Damage (Front)


Fringe


Selvedge


Knots



Thanks for any help!
- Wayne
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Old June 14th, 2018, 06:42 PM   #2
Marvin Amstey
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Right you are, Wayne: Hamadan, 2nd half 20th c. There are people who are knowledgeable about in what village this was woven; unfortunately, I am not one of them.
Too bad about the moth damage,
Best
Marvin
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Old June 14th, 2018, 10:59 PM   #3
Wayne Manley
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Thank you sir!
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Old June 15th, 2018, 03:49 AM   #4
Rich Larkin
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Hi Wayne,

Well, here I am again, contradicting one of my confrŤres about a rug attribution. I hate to do it, but I don't think that is a Hamadan rug.

The variety of designs in the rugs attributed to Hamadan is very broad, and yours could be one of them from that standpoint. However, the structure of it is not what is expected in a Hamadan. The usual wisdom has it that the rugs collected from the hundreds of villages surrounding Hamadan (and exported from there) are single-wefted, and yours is not. There are two wefts between each row of knots, each one in its own shed. (In truth, I have always been suspicious of that statement about Hamadan rugs. "Every single village uses the single-weft technique? I doubt it," was my thought. But the thing takes on the character of a self-fulfilling prophesy. And maybe they are/were all that way.)

Whatever the real deal might be in Hamadan and environs, I am inclined to think your rug is not from that matrix; and at least, it would not be taken as such in the trade, for the reasons indicated above. On the other hand, there is a range of commercial rugs from the area around Ardabil, about 275 miles due north of Hamadan, and about 35 miles west of the shore of the Caspian Sea, which have designs that are not inconsistent with your rug, and tend to have a structure along the lines of it as well. That is, double wefts, substantially depressed warps, and cotton foundations. In addition, the number of knots counted horizontally tends to be significantly lower than the number counted vertically, due to rows of knots being driven down forcibly ("squashed," effectively) in the weaving process. Accordingly, I would tentatively assign the rug to that general region. BTW, Ardabil is in the general vicinity, rug-weaving-wise, of Heris, Ahar, Mianeh, Serab, Meshkin, and such.

Rich
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Old June 15th, 2018, 01:52 PM   #5
Marvin Amstey
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I still see only one weft
OTOH, if there are two, Rich is quite correct.
Please tell us, Wayne, how many wefts there are. On my screen, the image is too bright and not high enough resolution to magnify.
Marvin
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Old June 15th, 2018, 02:35 PM   #6
Rich Larkin
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Hi Marvin and Wayne,

The rug cannot have single-weft construction and depressed warps. The warp depression occurs when a taut weft pulls the alternate warp down into the fabric and leaves the other prominent on the surface. The other weft is sinuous and rides on the surface (in this context, by "surface," I am referring to the back).

The image with the coin illustrates all this. The vertical rows or cords of prominent knot nodes are running in the direction of the warps, and each prominent node is half a knot. Next to each cord is a vertical trough, and you can just make out the node of the other half of each knot at the bottom. Then, next to each prominent knot node (above or below it in this image) is the corresponding white cotton weft rolling over the warp. This is the sinuous weft. Down in the trough next to that knot node is the other weft, the taut one, working to maintain the warp-depressed structure. You can see most of those wefts, too, though some are obscured by the density of the weave. So, looking at the image as a whole, following the rows of knots horizontally, you can make out two distinct rows of wefts, each one crossing over and under the warps across the rug, and each following the opposite path to its neighbor.

So, that's clear enough, right?

Rich
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Old June 15th, 2018, 06:21 PM   #7
Wayne Manley
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Good day sirs,

Thank you both for your insight on my recent acquisition. I must say that Iím quite intrigued, as I love a good mystery. Youíve both taught me much, as Iím slowly learning just how deep the history, manufacture, and design of hand-woven rugs can be. Itís a rather steep learning curve for the study of these rugs!

As requested, Iíve attached two images of the knots of my rug. In the first, Iíve circled what I believe to be one knot, based on my understanding of Richís explanation.

Knots (circled area is one knot?)


Knots detail


Researching on the lead that my rugís design may be inspired by those of the northwestern area of Iran; I found this Ardabil example with a border that seems very similar in theme to mine. Both have a floral (Herati-derived?) motif.

Ardabil 8í3Ēx6í6Ē



Borders (my rug is on the right side)



With appreciation,
- Wayne
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Old June 15th, 2018, 10:46 PM   #8
Marvin Amstey
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Definitely two wefts ! Not Hamadan.
Marvin
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Old June 16th, 2018, 01:59 AM   #9
Rich Larkin
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Hi Wayne,

If you want to find analogs to the border in your rug, google "crab border." You will find several. Then, look at a map of the Ardabil (Ardebil) area and you will see it is just south of the Caucasus. Google "Talish rugs" (which were woven not too far from the venue of your rug) and you will find examples that have borders similar to the rug you posted with the red field and green corners. (Geographical boundaries used to be different than they are now, and there is a considerable resemblance between many Caucasian rugs and many other rugs woven in the general vicinity of Ardabil.)

Going forward, I would suggest that assigning various rugs you may encounter to their most likely birthplace requires more than merely the recognition and matching up of similar designs. It is also very important to become familiar with the general structural characteristics of rugs from different venues. As you correctly mentioned,
Quote:
"Itís a rather steep learning curve for the study of these rugs!"
But is it fun to pursue it!

You are correct in your identification of a single knot in your image with the circle around it. That view is taken from the pile side of the rug your brother gave you, after the moths got to it. The close-up beneath it is the back.

BTW, a few of your images show some pink in the areas of the white cotton warps and wefts. This indicates that the red dye is not color-fast. That is not good, but fortunately, the rug got to you at the right price!

Rich
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Old June 17th, 2018, 12:47 AM   #10
Wayne Manley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larkin View Post
Going forward, I would suggest that assigning various rugs you may encounter to their most likely birthplace requires more than merely the recognition and matching up of similar designs. It is also very important to become familiar with the general structural characteristics of rugs from different venues.
Sage advice indeed. I will definitely do some research on the manufacture and structure of the various regions and styles.

Thank you,
- Wayne
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