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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old February 8th, 2018, 03:39 PM   #1
Gerry Gorman
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Default Tent Band??

An acquintaince asked me for information about this piled band. It has a flat weave section in the middle. Measures about 5 foot 8 inches in length. I think it does have some age though not that much maybe 1920s/ 1930s at the earliest,, I think it is turkmen, Chodor though not sure. All comments are welcome as usual.







Thanks Gerry
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Old February 8th, 2018, 04:08 PM   #2
Steve Price
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Hi Gerry

I don't think it's a tentband - much too short to gird a yurt. My guess is that it's a product of one of the Afghan groups we call Belouch, maybe a trapping for an animal or the wall of a tent. First half of the 20th century seems like a reasonable guess, but I think it could just as easily be more recent.

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Steve Price
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Old February 9th, 2018, 12:37 AM   #3
Patrick Weiler
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Gerry,

Here is a similar piece, though missing the center flatweave section.
(with a join at the location it would have been) and without tassels.
I suspect these modifications were done in an effort to make it more saleable.
It didn't work, obviously, because I was the only one who bought it.




The don't appear to be very old, sometime in the last century.
And their usage is not documented as far as I know.
This one is thought to be a Seistan band,
3-1/2" x 63", 9cm x 160cm, 9v x 9h for 82kpsi,
asymmetric open left. The selvage consists of
two warp units interlaced with the brown or
white ground wefts and reinforced with
herringbone-design red/green overcast.
There is some opinion that these were
specifically made as animal trappings,
such as seen on camels during a wedding
procession - which could explain the
practically unused appearance.

Patrick Weiler
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Old February 9th, 2018, 01:28 PM   #4
Gerry Gorman
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Default not a tent band

Hi Steve/Patrick,

Thanks for your comments. Your explanations certainly make sense. I had a feeling it had been modified to some extent as my search didn't come up with anything similar or anything that had a specific use. Possible made as some sort of ornamentation for a beast during a festival or ceremony. Thanks again Gerry
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Old February 10th, 2018, 05:02 AM   #5
Jeff Sun
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Not that these cultures are related in the least, but in Tibet, similar bands are used to hang bells on sheep, cows and yaks.
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Old February 11th, 2018, 01:15 AM   #6
Joel Greifinger
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Default Baluch camel trapping

Hi Gerry,

Brian Macdonald sold this one a while back. Like the one you posted, it also has bands of weft-substitution weave at the ends.





This is his description:
Antique Camel Trapping, Baluch Tribes, Western Afghanistan
This trapping would have been tied around the neck of the camel during long migrations and made as part of the bride's dowry. It is in perfect condition with original tassels and dates to around the 1920s.
Size: 1.65m x 15cm (5' 5" x 6").

Joel Greifinger
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Old February 11th, 2018, 04:22 PM   #7
Marvin Amstey
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I may have posted this in the past, but it applies to the current discussion, so here goes.
This is a knotted Tekke band, 10 inches by 5.5 feet that, I believe, was used to decorate a horse as a type of jewelry. It is very fine, silk-wefted and has 5 different silk colors in an otherwise all wool knotted band. The brighter red is artificial dating the piece to the first half 20 c. I apologize for the images, but these give one an idea of what it looks like (please excuse the first try below. Perhaps Steve can remove it).







Last edited by Marvin Amstey; February 11th, 2018 at 04:30 PM.
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Old February 13th, 2018, 06:05 PM   #8
Patrick Weiler
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Default Band of Thieves

Marvin,

That is an interesting object. It mimics the traditional tent band that would have used mostly flatweave ground with pile colored devices and which usually had kilim ends. The red honeycomb section I believe would have been done in some type of flatweave structure, near the end of a mixed-technique piece. In the mixed-technique bands, the pile is done in "tent-band" structure, where a shed is opened that lifts a set of warps up above the rest of the warps, and the pile knots are placed on the upper warps. When that shed is closed and the next rows of wefts are shot across, it is all tamped down tightly and from the back, the rear of the pile knots is nearly invisible. It may have originally been done this way to facilitate yurt assembly where the band had to integrate into the tent structure as a stabilizing element. Marla Mallett has a page devoted to how these are made:
http://www.marlamallett.com/bands.htm
Here is one from Furniture.com with a similar honeycomb in the ends:
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Old February 14th, 2018, 02:27 PM   #9
Marvin Amstey
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'morning Pat
There are also full pile tent bands, as I'm sure you are aware, that look just like the horse collar that I have illustrated in this discussion.
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