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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old January 6th, 2019, 03:23 PM   #1
Joy Richards
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Default Old and worn Caucasian, Kurdish or something else

Best wishes to one and all for 2019.

Not found or bought, but unexpectedly received as a gift. A very old and very worn little rug with a simple design. Maybe from a village up near the Azerbaijan border with Iran. 48" x 45" wool on wool.

Any comments please and thank you.

Taken indoors and not true to colour. Ignore the (coloured) carpet under it. Noted is the absence of 'wine glasses' in the major border, but flowers instead.



Put the quarter on the back and the front because it was hard to tell at that point which was which.





These taken outside and closer to the real colours. Pardon the balcony bar shadows.






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Old January 6th, 2019, 04:36 PM   #2
Filiberto Boncompagni
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Hi Joy,

Years ago we discussed about the possible origin of a rug with a similar motif:



Like yours, it had a coarse, symmetric knotting: 750 (knots/sq.dm)





Rugs with similar design where mostly attributed to Karabagh, like this prayer rug, From Hali (#68, page 156):





And this one, Bennett’s plate 108, with the “boteh” variation:



Another Karabagh:



This one, with medallions, was said to be a “Mingrelian” Kazak from Georgia



And this is a detail of an inscribed “Armenian Kazak” dated 1909, also with medallions that I just found on my HD, harvested years ago from the web:



Of course, Armenian could be from Karabagh as well.

The same main motif can be found elsewhere, like this yastik from Central Anatolia:



Or this rug, posted by Chuck Wagner, possibly from NW Persia but with asymmetric knots.



So… all considered, I would suggest Karabagh for your rug too.

About the coloring: either it was submitted to a chemical wash, or it was born like this. I know of Caucasians with a similar monochromatic palette.

Regards,

Filiberto
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Old January 7th, 2019, 05:39 PM   #3
Filiberto Boncompagni
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By the way, this pattern has a name: chibukli
According to P.R.J Ford (Oriental Carpet Design, page 64) the chibukli, "the Turkish word for a (smoker’s) pipe… is woven in both floral and geometric form in many parts of Orient, but especially in Khorassan, Qum and Genje". At page 65 Ford shows a Genje runner with the field formed by chibukli stripes, like the one in Bennett.

Filiberto
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Old January 7th, 2019, 07:55 PM   #4
Joy Richards
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Very interesting, Filiberto, thank you for that assortment of rugs and pictures. I've also just had a look at your discussion in http://www.turkotek.com/VB37/showthread.php?t=989 on the 'leaf and calyx' (leaf and wineglass) border which is what I was trying to concentrate on, since borders (and knots, of course) seem to be the first attempt to identify. I haven't been able to find a similar leaf and blossom border like the one on this little rug, but Bennett's plate 106 that you show looks like it has something very similar. Unfortunately, I don't have that book (I only have his Rugs & Carpets of the World) and I'm not able to magnify or zoom into your picture, but it would be nice to know where that particular prayer rug is from. Not that that would make it any easier to know where mine was woven, but it would show one of the influences.

The 'chibukli' pattern is the part of the rug that I least like! Now that I know it's a Turkish smoker's pipe, it makes it a bit more sympatico, but I don't have Ford's book either, as I decided to get Peter Stone's Tribal and Village Rugs instead, and in that book he covers quite a few examples of the leaf and calyx and leaf and blossom, none of which look similar to mine. Borders are many and cover a very wide area, but this particular 'leaf' for me is very Caucasian

As for the colours - to my inexperienced eye - they actually look undyed. Maybe camel and different sheep wools? One side is more faded than the other. What makes you think it was submitted to a chemical wash? And why would they do that? (I hope this isn't a ridiculously naive question).

The rug is becoming a little more appealing as I look at it and its simple design, and I'm afraid the cats find it extremely pleasant to lie on and occupy. One on each corner.

Even if the ultimate source can never be found for thousands of these little works of art, the variety of influences gives us a peek into where these tribes meandered back and forth.

Joy
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Old January 8th, 2019, 08:17 AM   #5
Filiberto Boncompagni
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Hi Joy,

I know that rugs were sometimes bleached. I don’t know exactly why. I suppose they did it to correct harsh colors or bad discolorations. Or for color-blind customers.

There are also rugs woven using beige and brown undyed wool.

If that is the case for your rug, though, I wouldn't expect a “faded” front. Or may be undyed wool is also subject to fading? I don't know...

Regards,

Filiberto
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Old January 8th, 2019, 09:56 PM   #6
Dinie Gootjes
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Hi Joy, Filiberto,

The fact that the rug does not have any blue, makes me think it may be undyed wool. Most rugs have some blue, and usually bleaching hardly affects that colour. We once had a large NWP rug that had been bleached. The result was blue with several shades of brown and ivory. When you dug deep into the individual brownish knots, you could find the original colours, but the indigo blue was fine. The rug is long gone , but I may have a picture somewhere. The effect was different from Joy’s rug.
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Old January 9th, 2019, 02:26 PM   #7
Filiberto Boncompagni
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Hi Dinie,

The other obvious possibility is that the rug was woven with dyed wool but with only a brown-beige palette...
Regards,

Filiberto
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Old January 17th, 2019, 04:56 AM   #8
Dinie Gootjes
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Hi Filiberto,

True. In that case we could expect the brown areas to be lower than the beige areas. From the pictures I cannot really tell if there is much of a difference.

Dinie
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