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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old August 12th, 2018, 11:02 AM   #1
Phil Bell
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Default To repair or not to repair?

I thought I would share my progress in repairing my best rug. I really want to get this rug back into good shape and having sorted the selvedge on one side and repaired a smalll hole I am now taking on the bigger hole which had been darned. I am very much an amateur at this and so I am dogged by the worry 'am I wrecking a beautiful thing'. Am I doing the equivalent of filling in the cracks on a Rembrandt with a felt tip pen because they look better to me.

I dont intend to sell it ever but it doesnt 'belong' to me in the sense that it will one day be in someone elses house, someone who will love it. I dont want them to think, Oh I wish he hadnt done that!

You will notice I havent cut the pile yet, partly because I wanted to secure it with a hot iron and partly because I am living in both fear and hope of what it may look like.
I wonder if I should ask the customary question 'where are you going for your holidays' while I give it a haircut. I am guessing the answer if it could talk would be north west Persia or eastern Turkey.






Last edited by Phil Bell; August 12th, 2018 at 11:07 AM.
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Old August 12th, 2018, 07:40 PM   #2
Rich Larkin
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Looks pretty good, Phil.

I gather you have already done some pile trimming on the smaller hole, and you don't need any advice. For what it's worth, I recommend taking it slow and not trying to get it 'just right' on the first cut. I have found that by trimming it to slightly longer than it will ultimately be, then tweaking that, you can get a good result that isn't too low. Shaving it down with an ordinary razor you might use on your face can be useful.

I do not foresee future generations condemning you for filling that hole.

Rich
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Old August 13th, 2018, 01:27 PM   #3
Ken Shum
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Nice looking Shirvan Phil.

Not that I'm super experienced, but may I suggest trimming with scissors first and then following up with electric hair clippers? With the hair clippers, you can sculpt the new pile to blend into the existing.
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Old August 13th, 2018, 06:23 PM   #4
Phil Bell
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Ken,

You arent the first person to call this Caucasian, recently it was described as a Kazak by a fairly experienced dealer I showed the photo to. It is actually Jaf Kurd.

Electric hair clippers v Razor. I have never used either for cutting back pile but I will try, probably the latter first as I have that. I used to have a pair of surgical scissors that were angled which allowed a good line of attack.

This is the biggest repair I have attempted for many years, suddenly my every waking moment seems to be eaten up with the task.

Phil
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Old August 13th, 2018, 07:29 PM   #5
Joel Greifinger
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Quote:
You aren't the first person to call this Caucasian, recently it was described as a Kazak by a fairly experienced dealer I showed the photo to. It is actually Jaf Kurd.
Hi Phil,
Could you post a picture of the entire rug?
Joel
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Old August 13th, 2018, 08:42 PM   #6
Phil Bell
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Joel,

You have actually seen this rug. It was one of my first posts many moons ago.
I am happy to post again or should I say Steve will be happy to post (I hope)

I am confident that it is Jaf Kurd because it's attribution was made by people I have great respect for, they are two of my mentors, guiding me through the complex world of rug attribution.
Their names are Joel Greifinger and Rich Larkin, you probably know them.

I include Filiberto and Steve also but they didn't actually contribute on this one I think.

Phil
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Old August 14th, 2018, 09:47 AM   #7
Danielle Duperreault
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I logged-in just to say "wow." Seriously. It's impressive that you know how to fix / work on rugs. How did you learn to do this?

I would also love to see a photo of the entire rug.
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Old August 14th, 2018, 10:06 AM   #8
Filiberto Boncompagni2
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No problem.






Nice work, Phil!
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Old August 14th, 2018, 06:07 PM   #9
Phil Bell
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Filiberto,

You truly are a magician to conjure up that photo. I checked the locks to see if you had broken into my house while I was out to take that photo, I guess you probably got it from the server from a couple of years ago. I hope you did anyway.

You can just see the darned hole at the top left corner.

Danielle,

Weaving and knotting is not that hard, doing it well is. I don't consider myself to be that good and I can imagine a true restorer shaking their head in dismay at my attempts.
Putting the warps in is painful, dangerous and time consuming. The wefts are easier and the knotting straightforward once you work out the pattern. The tricky bit is matching the colours and getting tension right. I use Appleton's tapestry wool which has good colours but the wool is a little fuzzy and dry compared to the quality of most rug pile. I have never found anything comparable in quality with the right colours.

I may post the finished repair but if I don't then you can assume some disaster has taken place and I may disappear for some time in hope that everyone forgets this ever happened.

Repairing rugs is no harder than crochet which incidentally I also do. I am probably the only crocheting man in England and it isn't something one advertises normally, but I feel I among cultured people here so...
My name is Phil and I can crochet.
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Old August 14th, 2018, 08:29 PM   #10
Filiberto Boncompagni2
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Hi Phil,

I could have used my teleportation powers and my Cloak of Invisibility, of course. But since I archive every threads on my HDs, I preferred to retrieve the images you posted on August 19th, 2017.

Teleportation always gives me headaches…
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Old August 14th, 2018, 09:46 PM   #11
Ken Shum
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I was misled buy the X and squares
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