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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old September 16th, 2018, 07:43 PM   #1
Wendy Dunleavy
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Default Steve says this is the best of the three!

Your thoughts please on this beauty. The colour is so deep. It's much bluer and less red than the photos but this was the best I could do. I'm very interested by the fact that at least one of the warp threads is shorter than the others, at about the 2/3 mark, but I'd love to know it's origin and a possible date. I found it at a flea market where I live in France.







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Old September 16th, 2018, 10:37 PM   #2
Marvin Amstey
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Beluch colors; stylized Ersari minikani design; 90 degree warp depression. Probably done in Pakistan (or Iran) within the last 30 years.
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Old September 16th, 2018, 11:25 PM   #3
Steve Price
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Hi Marvin

That's my guess as well, although I think it's more likely to have been woven in Iran than in Pakistan.

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Old September 16th, 2018, 11:59 PM   #4
Rich Larkin
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Hi Wendy,

As Marvin suggested, the pattern of your rug is related to an earlier design (“Mina Khani”) that was familiar in older rugs that appeared in various venues in Iran, including areas populated by Kurdish peoples. Baluchi weavers of pile rugs the region of Khorassan in northeastern Iran, and vicinity, who had been relocated there in the 18th and 19th centuries by potentates for political reasons, implemented the design. The following example is probably a relatively old one that reflects the basic “Mina Khani” layout, including a style of border that often appears with this field design. The white-petaled flower at the interstices of the source design is an important element. Four, five and six petal versions can be found, though I believe the five-petaled one is the old paradigm. For purposes of comparison, the rug I have posted is about four feet plus by nine feet.



The rug below, probably woven in the first half of the 20th century, shows a later development of the type, with four very regular petals in the flower; and it utilizes a familiar border approach that also appears in your rug. It is approximately three feet by five.



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Old September 17th, 2018, 07:26 AM   #5
Filiberto Boncompagni2
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Hi Wendy,

More than 20 years ago I bought from an Iranian dealer a large new "balouch" with similar colors and almost identical back. The dealer said it was made in Iran. It has gray wefts (like it seems to be in your case as well, but the photo is too small to be sure) which seems to be a characteristic of modern Iranian "balouch" production.
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Old September 17th, 2018, 10:47 AM   #6
Wendy Dunleavy
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How exciting! Any thoughts on the shorter warp thread? It seems bizarre to me. Wonder if it is created like that to fold over and divan of some sort?
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Old September 17th, 2018, 11:40 AM   #7
Steve Price
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendy Dunleavy View Post
How exciting! Any thoughts on the shorter warp thread? It seems bizarre to me. Wonder if it is created like that to fold over and divan of some sort?
Hi Wendy

The wrinkle at one end is very unlikely to have been a short warp on the loom and is a result of something that happened to it later. Perhaps it got wet and shrunk irregularly. Who knows? Incidentally, there are similar wrinkles at both ends of the first piece Rich posted.

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Old September 17th, 2018, 11:48 AM   #8
Wendy Dunleavy
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Yes, I was just coming to that conclusion Steve. Thanks
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Old September 17th, 2018, 12:48 PM   #9
Rich Larkin
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Hi Wendy,

Such irregular shape conditions ('short' warps, etc.) are more likely to occur in weavings with wool foundations than those with cotton. (As Filiberto noted, your piece probably has cotton wefts; and the warps look like wool.) I note that there seems to be a little waviness at the other end of your rug as well, affecting its willingness to lie completely flat. It is a familiar situation in Baluch rugs. If you look in the upper right corner of the second image I posted, you can see a seam running through the 'X' element there, just a few degrees off vertical, where someone actually removed part of the rug (in the middle of the 'X') in an attempt to ease the irregular shape.

It is said these shape conditions are more common in the weavings of Baluchis and other more rural or rustic peoples because they wove on relatively primitive looms, often staked onto the ground. In some cases, their nomadic way of life requires that they take such looms up and reset them elsewhere. I am not necessarily telling you any of those measures were part of the weaving of your rug, but we can say the slightly irregular condition probably reflects a weaving situation that in one way or another was not under the complete control of the weaver.

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Old September 17th, 2018, 01:17 PM   #10
Steve Price
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Hi Rich

My guess is that the frequent irregularities in the shapes of rugs woven on wool foundations is that the length of wool fibers is unstable - it stretches and shrinks easily. Cotton is less unstable, but is very prone to shrinking if it gets wet.

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Old September 17th, 2018, 02:42 PM   #11
Wendy Dunleavy
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Thanks so much to you all for sharing. Truly beautiful pieces, inspiring and educational. I'm looking at all the borders now!
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