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Old July 24th, 2018, 01:49 AM   #86
Joy Richards
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Join Date: Jun 2018
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Thank you so much Dinie. The little is rug finally recognized, and with such a charming name. Thankfully, the wool is good and floppy.

I googled 'Tchitchaktu', and up came a 2002 TurkoTek thread http://www.turkotek.com/salon_00082/s82t23.htm which includes mention by Filiberto of a rug he'd received as a gift:

"It was new and they told us it was Afghan. I didnít like it at first - it is not the sort of colors I like in rugs - but with time I got accustomed to it. Good wool, very fine weaving, very good craftsmanship. In these few years the carpet improved a little, so it is a real one, not a "carpetoid" as Michel Bischof would say. From Parsonsí "The Carpets of Afghanistan" it matches the palette of the Tchitchaktu Production".
According to Parsons, these rugs are (or were - donít know what is going on now) woven by Pasthun tribes who learned recently to weave knotted piles from the few Turkomans living in the area. The "Tchitchaktu rugs" appeared first in the summer of 1971.
You may not like it, but it shows a great maturity in spite of its lack of tradition. "

I've quoted this for those of us who don't have Parsons' book and I've italicized what I think deserves to be emphasized.

Joy
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