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Old September 10th, 2017, 07:34 PM   #63
Kay Dee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larkin View Post
What do you think is the case? That the dye was corrosive, or that the pile was clipped low in the first instance?
That it had been clipped / incised.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larkin View Post
I acquired the rug in about 1970 ---------- I think the mat is probably pre-1900.
I agree that it certainly looks more like c1900, not late 20c.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larkin View Post
Your comment about the Chinese rug possibly having been woven for the Tibetan market (or perhaps some other specific market) is interesting
That book I mentioned, The Tiger Rugs of Tibet by Mimi Lipton - although much more expert folks than I have pointed out some 'flawed assumptions' (for want of a better word) contained within - has arguably the best collection of photos of Tibetan tiger rugs there is. It is certainly THE book on Tibetan tiger rugs, although the caveat above applies it seems. Photos are alone worth the cos though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larkin View Post
It is evident that the various design elements are part of a specific tradition, as reflected for example in the middle one of the three pieces you posted. In that regard, by the way, I had owned it for quite a while before I came to realize it represented a tiger pelt. Before that discovery, I had been working on a theory that had the wiggily stripes as some sort of sea creature, the spine down the middle a feeding trough, and the outer border a vast, foaming ocean. All I can say about that is, speculative research can be extremely dangerous.
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