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Old August 27th, 2017, 08:28 AM   #11
Kay Dee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
Hello Kay Dee and All!
In 2013 Koos de Jong gave our rug society a great presentation about his newly-published book. Why didn’t I buy a copy then? Well, it was pricey, and the second volume, a Chinese translation of the first, was beyond my competence. In time, I thought, the two volumes will become available separately at a better price.
Well first they are (available at a better price, see message below), or should I say one is at least. Recently (last year) I bought what you refer to as the '1st volume' as a present for a friend. And that is the one with English text and suburb, if somewhat small, photos. But I guarantee you it is the last word on Tib/Chin/Mong saddle rugs!!! And available.

And no, unless I am very mistaken, the '2nd volume' you mention is just the mirror image Chinese text of the English text in the '1st volume' but with no photos. It was originally sold as a two book set, published in HK if IIRC. And the much thinner Chinese versions was just so / for Chinese who couldn't read English, would still buy the book. So you are missing nothing at all in what you refer to as the '2nd volume', as the English text AND all the rug photos are in the so-called '1st' volume.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
Robert Piccus’s Sacred and Secular seems like a better bet at the moment.
If I could only by one I might lean to 'From the Land of the Snow Lion' but the Piccus book has more and better rugs, but not necessarily better descriptions, IMO anyway. Like I said before, very hard to pick between all three I mentioned. And given the 'new' cheap prices I found, I'd be buying all three without hesitation. That is, at the risk of me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
Bhutanese textiles are a little distant for me, but some years ago Diana Myers treated our rug society to a fascinating program on these remarkable weavings. So maybe Mark Barthomew’s book on his collection is worth a look, even if only for educational purposes!
Yes, but not before I bought the three rug books.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
For Chinese rugs I have ordered the Rippon Boswell catalogue of the Te-Chun Wang collection.
Well an 'old' book (pub. 1978), and again IMO, has nothing on the three I have mentioned (and no, I get no commission etc, for recommending them, nor do I even know the three authors personally). May I be so rude as to ask what you paid for it? Should be between 40-50USD at most, but the other books on his collections of 1) saddle rugs and 2) on Chinese dowry rugs seem to all start in the 95/100USD and up range. But again, somewhat (now) dated text-wise books. Beautiful rugs in all though!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
And Glanz der Himmelssöhne is not cheap, but perhaps worth a go; the German text I think I could manage.
Not before the other books I mention. It is all in German, while the other three are ALL in English. And all so cheap now! And I cannot repeat enough times, THE latest words on the subjects you are interested in by acknowledged leaders in their field of expertise and extremely well written, (not just somebody showing his collection, however nice, as the Te-Chun Wang Collection book basically is, no offense meant to him.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Kannenberg View Post
Surely it’s Chinese, but I thought a red cloth edging says “Tibet”. The books should help on this point and others (Is it OK? Is it a dog? From where in China? And so forth) Any comments would be gratefully received!
I’d, need to see a close up of the knots on back (if back not covered that is), and if covered then a close up of front, both pile and especially a worn area that is: but at first glance 'looks' to me to be Chinese (and if so, most likely made in Ningxia), but IMO definitely made for the Tibetan market, hence some 'things' of note in it, but the red covered felt edges were almost certainly put on 'post production' in Tibet itself, even if the rug was not made there. But it also could just as easily be Tibetan made, and maybe it is (again, need to see knots to be 100% sure either way). Whatever it is Lloyd, it certainly aint no dog! If you have it though, just throw it out in the trash bin (but my trash bin) ANYtime.

EDIT. I will now stick my neck out here, after another look at it, and say that I think it is Tibetan made, (the centre, wherever it's made, being just a copy of a Chinese brocade pattern, which Tibetans often used in there rugs too), but lets see the pics if possible please.

Last edited by Kay Dee; August 27th, 2017 at 12:09 PM.
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