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Marvin Amstey
September 15th, 2017, 05:50 PM
Photoshop works.

Kay Dee
September 23rd, 2017, 05:58 AM
Photoshop works.

I have found that a 72dpi web rug image can usually be 'pumped up' to 125dpi (thus automatically increasing width and height also) without any / Úr at worst very very little loss of quality in most, while some others may need a little more tweaking to get 'clear / sharp'. Much bigger than 125 and they seem to start 'falling apart' / blurring up.

However I also collect WWII naval photos, and oddly (if 72 to start with) they dont like to go higher than 100dpi before starting to 'fall aprt'.

I guess a lot depends on what one finds accepatable though.

Does anyone have any other PS tricks they'd like to share?

Jeff Sun
September 27th, 2017, 02:59 AM
Hi Lloyd,

Back to your rug for a minute. The the book discussion earlier in this thread lead me to buy From the Land of the Snow Lion. On page 80 of this book, Elena Tsarev talks about the rare usage of Carving Effect and Sculpturing in Tibetan rugs.

1. Carving effect is a natural process caused by the uneven wear of differently dyed, or different quality of yarns. The end result, over time is pile of slightly different heights. This is most often seen on high end monastic rugs, because a commissioned rug weaver could draw from several sources as they saw fit. In contrast, most homemade rugs only use one type of wool...whatever was wandering around the pasture most likely.

2. Weavers must have been pretty quick to catch on that the carving effect made some designs really stand out in 3 dimensions.Sculpturi ng (her term) is what we have been calling carving. This is a trim done by hand to achieve the same effect as natural carving. An imitation if you will.

Well, that's Tsarev's hypothesis anyway. Who knows what the weaver's actual motivation was. Probably just to make it look good.

Having already determined from the weave that your rug is not Tibetan, but given the Tiger skin motif, and general excellent quality, it could have been made for the Tibetan market, specifically, the Tibetan monastic market. And of course either Carving Effect or Sculpturing could apply to your rug.

Tsarev mentions that the way to tell the difference between the two effects is that tufts subject to carving effect will all be equal, where as hand done sculpturing will be a gradual fade. To be plain, she mixes her terminology at the end, but I think that is what she meant to say.

As from the pics it looks like the effected outline is only a couple of pile tufts wide, I would say it is likely Carving Effect rather than Sculpture. Not much room for gradual fade in such a small space.

Discuss amongst yourselves ( insert sheep, yak and cashmere goat emoji here).

Kay Dee
September 27th, 2017, 10:09 AM
That 'Land of Snow Lion' is a great book, eh Jeff! Really is one of the three I consider the very best on said subject.

Anyway, here is a pic of a sculptured rug owner claims is Tibetan (which it isn't) and circa 1900, but I doubt that 'fact' to. :rant:

However, it shows well the sculpturing / incising technique intentionally done.

http://imagizer.imageshack. us/v2/xq90/923/3dtcac.jpg (https://imageshack.com/i/pn3dtcacj)

Jeff Sun
September 27th, 2017, 11:48 AM
That 'Land of Snow Lion' is a great book, eh Jeff! Really is one of the three I consider the very best on said subject.

Anyway, here is a pic of a sculptured rug owner claims is Tibetan (which it isn't) and circa 1900, but I doubt that 'fact' to. He :rant:

However, it shows well the sculpturing / incising technique intentionally done.

http://imagizer.imageshack. us/v2/xq90/923/3dtcac.jpg (https://imageshack.com/i/pn3dtcacj)

Good example on sculpting.Considerin g it Looks like a Tianjin or Beijing fragment from the last 50 years, sculpting is to be expected.

Rich Larkin
September 28th, 2017, 01:19 PM
Hi Folks,

The little (Beijing?) mat is a good example of the sort of 'sculpting' I was referring to. I have handled a few of these. The overall weight and weave character of them is quite different from the piece I posted in frame #57 of this thread, and the degree of sculpting is much more subtle than the Beijing type.

Rich

Rich Larkin
September 28th, 2017, 03:24 PM
Hi Folks,

Since we are beating this topic into the ground, it is only fitting that I do my part. This little (ca. 2'+ X 4'+) mat features some (presumably) clipped sculpting. It doesn't show very clearly on the screen, but the middle image gives the idea. The clipping is at the color separations on that lantern, or vase, or whatever it is.

http://www.turkotek.com/show_and_tell/Blue_Chin_full.jpg

http://www.turkotek.com/show_and_tell/Blue_Chin_det2.jpg

http://www.turkotek.com/show_and_tell/Blue_Chin_det_bk2.jp g

I note (with regret) the inconsistency of the color fidelity from image to image. The most accurate is the middle image, though its tone is just a tick towards the version of the light blue of the bottom image. There is a slight color shift as between the front and back, but it is not nearly as pronounced as it appears here.

I take the rug to be a rural product. There is a modest amount of hair ("kemp") in the pile, giving it a different texture than one finds in the more conventional Chinese product with clipping around the designs. Furthermore, the light blue was absorbed unevenly by the yarn, resulting in the heathered effect shown in the middle image. I assume this was the result of the manner in which the wool was prepared for dyeing.

It happens I acquired the piece (about 45 years ago) at the same time I acquired the tiger pelt patterned mat I posted earlier. In fact, I was only going for the blue mat immediately above, having been mezmerized by the heather field; but the elderly dealer from whom I was buying, who had been serving as something of a rug mentor for me at the time, reached into a stack and pulled out the tiger stripe number, saying, "Here, you want this one too," adding it to the bill. I was concerned I didn't have the dough :money:, being in school at the time, but I was too embarrassed to object. I lacked the wit at the time to realize he was doing me a big favor. Anyway, I came up with the cash, and it all turned out well. :)

I believe the red dye shown in the rug no longer appears in Chinese rugs, the rights having been purchased by the Kool-Aid soft drink people. :fez: Dye-crank that I am, I don't really mind. It hasn't bled, and I am careful to keep the rug out of the bathtub.

Rich